University chancellor says she is an ‘accidental trailblazer’ for ladies in Stem | EUROtoday

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

The new chancellor of a Scottish college, who describes herself as an “accidental trailblazer”, has stated she is going to fulfil the function for the widespread good.

Anne-Marie Imafidon has spent her profession serving to younger ladies break into the largely male-dominated science, expertise, engineering and maths (Stem).

Recognised world wide for founding Stemettes, a social enterprise which inspires women and younger ladies to enter the sphere, Dr Imafidon might be formally put in as chancellor of Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) on July 2.

She might be changing singer and campaigner Annie Lennox, the college’s earlier chancellor.

The chancellor pictured outside of Glasgow Caledonian University. (GCU/PA)
The chancellor pictured outdoors of Glasgow Caledonian University. (GCU/PA)

As Scotland’s largest fashionable college, GCU promotes ladies’s participation in Stem via its outreach programmes, mentoring, and by providing scholarships for ladies in engineering, and has additionally obtained awards for its dedication to gender equality.

Originally from London, Dr Imafidon, 33, has labored on a variety of Stem tasks, together with writing books on the trade, internet hosting podcasts and showing on tv reveals, and Stemettes has reached round 60,000 younger ladies.

Ahead of her set up as chancellor, she stated she is “really excited” to be working with GCU, and that she plans to be a “chancellor for the common good” – a key worth held by the college.

She stated: “I actually set up quite a number of different businesses before I started Stemettes as an organisation and ran a networking events company at one point with my friends.”

It was her early experiences of assorted types of discrimination that led her to assist make Stem industries a extra accepting house for ladies.

She stated: “There are lots of things that were different about me that never really seemed to crop up in conversations or as we were building databases or whatever else.

“It’s always been an interesting one to kind of reflect on being in that minority and something that, at times, is also a shrinking minority in technical spaces.

“Stem has always been something I’ve enjoyed doing,  as a hobby as well as a career, and it’s only as I’ve got older and been more perceptive.

“It’s interesting to reflect on being in that minority and something that, at times, is also a shrinking minority in technical spaces.

The new chancellor met with GCU students earlier this year. (Peter Devlin/GCU/PA)
The new chancellor met with GCU students earlier this year. (Peter Devlin/GCU/PA)

“I’ve looked up and looked around in those rooms and noticed there’s something off about me being one of the only women in this space. I’ve ended up being an accidental trailblazer, recognising there’s a problem and wanting to do something about it. I’ve been driven and motivated, and also fortunate, to have an impact on changing the situation.

“Starting Stemettes was a response to me noticing that I was one of very few women in the room. There’s a knock-on impact not just for individuals stepping into male-dominated tech spaces, but also for the economy at large.

“I started Stemettes with the realisation that, if I ever have children, I don’t want them to reflect on the fact that their mum is one of the only ones left in a space that’s driving so much of what’s going on in the world.

“If I have any girls, I don’t want them to feel like this is not something they should be a part of. The innovation we have now is hindered by not having women and girls at least around the table.

“We’re building a lot of technology that’s ending up harming not only women and girls, but all of society, creating more problems than it’s solving with each technological advance.”

She added: “I actually set up quite a number of different businesses before I started Stemettes as an organisation.

“I ran a networking events company at one point with my friends, and my best friend and I, for a very, very short period, ran a dating company as well.

“At GCU we have a big focus on entrepreneurship as well and the opportunities that that creates for folks when they embark on that journey.

The Chancellor with Cara Nicole Edgar, a 4th year BEng (Hons) Computer Aided Mechanical Engineering student. (Peter Devlin/GCU/PA)
The Chancellor with Cara Nicole Edgar, a 4th year BEng (Hons) Computer Aided Mechanical Engineering student. (Peter Devlin/GCU/PA)

“Starting Stemettes was actually a response to me noticing that I was one of very few in the room, but also that there’s a knock-on impact not just for individuals that would be stepping into male-dominated tech spaces, but also the economy at large.

“I started Stemettes in that realisation that while I don’t have children, if I do I don’t want them to reflect on the fact that their mum is one of the only ones left in a space that’s driving so much of what’s going on in the world.

“If I have any girls I don’t want them to feel like this is not something they should be a part of, and also any of the innovation that we have now by not having women and girls at least around that table.

“We’re building a lot of technology that’s ending up harming not only women and girls, but all of society and is creating more problems that it’s solving with each technological advance.”

Dr Imafidon might be put in as GCU chancellor on the Royal Concert Hall in Glasgow on Tuesday, as a part of three days of graduations ceremonies for the college’s college students.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/glasgow-caledonian-university-annie-lennox-stem-london-glasgow-b2571563.html